Social Studies


The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good. Social studies draws upon a variety of disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology.

The study of history shows that, as decisions of the past have had consequences, so too, will the decisions of tomorrow. We believe that students should see themselves as global citizens who strive to create structure for justice and harmony.

World History and Geography

This course features a survey of predominant world cultures, blending historical and contemporary culture in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. It is designed to equip students with basic social studies skills, to analyze the political, social, and economic issues from prehistoric times until the 18th century. Topics include geography and environment, belief systems, empires, golden ages and non-political revolutions. 1 Year. Level 1.


World History and Geography Honors

Placement in World History and Geography H is determined by scores on the entrance exam. In addition to the goals set down in World History and Geography, World History and Geography H provides further development of the AP historical disciplinary skills of analyzing historical evidence and argument development through the analysis of both primary and secondary sources. Students will also develop AP historical reasoning skills: contextualization, comparison, causation and continuity and change over time through more extensive oral and written assignments. 1 Year. Level 3.

Modern World History

This course covers important political, economic and cultural developments around the world during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics studied and researched during this period include governmental changes, emerging economies and technologies, nationalism and imperialism, causes and results of the world wars, revolutions, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War era. 1 Year. Level 1.


Modern World History Honors

This course covers important political, economic and cultural developments around the world during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics studied and researched during this period include governmental changes, emerging economies and technologies, nationalism and imperialism, causes and results of the World Wars, revolutions, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War era. More extensive outside reading, research and project work is required. This course is designed to prepare the students for Advanced Placement (AP) work as juniors. 1 Year. Level 1.


Modern American History

Required of all juniors not in AP U.S. History. This course delves deeply into social, political and economic change in America, from the post-Civil War era through the present day. Topics include westward expansion, immigration and urbanization, the Progressive Era, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the World Wars, the Cold War era, and civil rights and the era of social change. Students will work independently and collaboratively in order to expand their understanding of American history and to expand their oral and written communication skills. 1 Year. Level 1.


AP U.S. History

Starting in the 1600’s ranging all the way to the present day, this course covers the social, political and economic causes and effects of American history at the rigorous, in-depth and nuanced level of College Board Advanced Placement curriculum . This course is offered to advanced juniors who have demonstrated an exceptional ability to write cohesively and read comprehensively. A summer assignment is required. AP Exam fee required. 1 Year. Level 4.

AP European History

This is a full year course covering the political, social, economic and cultural events of Europe from 1450 to the present. Topics include the Renaissance, Reformation, rise of nation states, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the age of revolutions, totalitarianism and the resurgence of post-war Europe. A summer assignment is required. AP Exam fee required. 1 Year. Level 4.

Intro to Economics

Required of all seniors not in AP U. S. Government and Politics. This course focuses on both macro and micro economic principles in seeking to explain how various economic systems function. Topics include a comparison of various economic systems, supply and demand in a market/capitalist economy, economic measurements, the study of business organizations/models and the role of the stock market. Students will also learn aspects of personal finance. This course employs techniques of analysis and presents a fundamental method of economic reasoning. 1 Semester. Level 1.

American Government

Required of all seniors not in AP U.S. Government and Politics. This course begins with a study and discussion about the creation, nature, structure and operations of many governments, but with a focus on U.S. government. The students will then choose three (3) of the following units of study that they deem most interesting to them, including: the judicial system, the legislative process, the function and operations of the executive branch, political party history and political development from colonial times to the present. 1 Semester. Level 1.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

This is a full year course offered in lieu of American Government and Intro to Economics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following: Constitutional underpinnings of the government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media’s effect on government, institutions of the national government, public policy, civil rights and liberties. An online economic component is included. A summer assignment is required. AP Exam fee required. 1 Year. Level 4.

Introduction to Psychology

In this semester long course, students will take an active part in exploring essential topics in the field of psychology. Throughout this study of human behavior and the mind, students will gain insight into the history of the field of psychology and explore current theories and issues in areas such as behaviorism, psychotherapy, cognition, social psychology, psychology of difference, among others. Students will learn about and practice particular academic skills needed to conduct scientific research. Open to juniors and seniors. 1 Semester. 4 Days/Cycle. Alpha. Level 1.

Happiness and Well-being

Based on research from the field of positive psychology, this semester-long course will explore the science and meaning behind happiness, and what Aristotle termed, eudemonia, or well-being. Students will engage in practical strategies that will easily be integrated into their own lives to encourage increased moments of both. Topics explored will include happiness, creativity, flow, gratitude, forgiveness, empathy, mindfulness, kindness, and spirituality. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 1 Semester. 4 Days/Cycle. Alpha. Level 1.

Introduction to Interpersonal Communication Theory

This half-year course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of interpersonal communication theory. By participating in class discussions, small group activities, and role plays, students will better understand their relationships and recognize how these theories apply in their personal lives. Topics covered include Johari’s Window, Social Penetration Theory, Cognitive Dissonance and Uncertainty Reduction Theory. 1 Semester. 4 Days/Cycle. Alpha. Level 1.