Social Studies


The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good. Social studies draws upon a variety of disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology.

The study of history shows that, as decisions of the past have had consequences, so too, will the decisions of tomorrow. We believe that students should see themselves as global citizens who strive to create structure for justice and harmony.

Global Studies I

This course follows the New York State curriculum for ninth grade social studies featuring a survey of predominant world cultures, blending historical and contemporary culture in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. It is designed to equip students with basic social studies skills, to analyze the political, social, and economic issues from prehistoric times until the 18th century. During the second semester one outside reading assignment will be required. 1 year, level 1.

Global Studies I H

Placement in Global I Honors is determined by scores on the entrance exam. In addition to the goals set down in Global I, Global I Honors provides further enrichment through analysis of current events, study of primary source documents and the completion of additional reading and writing assignments. Global I Honors also considers the role of women in various historical periods and different cultural settings. 1 year, level 3.

Pre AP World History

This course is designed to help students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global themes and interactions between different types of human societies over the time period of 800 B.C.E. to present day. The course advances this understanding using a combination of global history knowledge and analytical skills. A summer assignment is required. 1 year, level 4.

Global Studies II

This course is further development of social studies skills through the study of world cultural, economic, and political developments from the late 17th century to the present. 1 year, level 1.

Global Studies II H

This course is an honors level study of world cultural, economic, and political developments from the late 17th century to the present. More extensive reading and project work required. During the second semester outside reading will be required It is recommended that a student have a 92% average in Global Studies I and English I or an 88% average in Global Studies I H and English I H. NOTE: To qualify for Global II H, it is strongly recommended that a student be eligible for English 10 H. 1 year, level 3.

AP World History (Part II)

This is the completion of Pre-AP World History I taking students up to the present day. A summer assignment is required and the AP World History exam is required at the end of the sophomore year. $93.00 AP exam fee required. 1 year, level 4.

U.S. History and Government

This course follows the New York State curriculum for the American History and Government Regents course, while delving deeper into social, political and economic change in America and building on oral and written communicative skills. Required of all juniors not in AP U.S. History. Regents Exam is required. 1 year, level 1

AP U.S. History

Starting in the 1600’s ranging all the way to the present day, this course covers the social, political and economic causes and effects of American history at the rigorous, in-depth and nuanced level of Advanced Placement. The AP exam in U.S.History (May) is required. This course is offered to advanced juniors who have demonstrated an exceptional ability to write cohesively and read comprehensively. A summer assignment is required. AP exam required. $93.00 AP exam fee required. 1 year, level 4.

AP European History

This is a full year course covering the political, social, economic and cultural events of Europe from 1450 to the present. Topics include the Renaissance, Reformation, Rise of Nation States, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, Totalitarianism and the Resurgence of Post-War Europe. A summer assignment is required. AP exam required. $93.00 AP exam fee is required. 1 year, level 4.

Intro to Economics

Required of all seniors not in AP U. S. Government and Politics. This course focuses on both macro and micro economic principles in seeking to explain how the American economy functions. Topics include supply and demand in the free enterprise system, growth of corporate America, and the role of the stock market. Students will learn aspects of personal finance. An emphasis is placed on research techniques, which utilize the school’s accessibility to computer on-line services. This course employs techniques of analysis and presents a fundamental method of economic reasoning. 1 semester, level 1.

Law and Government

Required of all seniors not in AP U.S. Government and Politics. This course provides students with a practical perspective on many legal problems of everyday life. It includes the philosophy of law-making with an emphasis on the role of moral value systems in the judicial system. It also includes the nature and origin of civil and criminal law, and incorporates first-hand observation of court procedures. 1 semester, level 1.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

This is a full year course offered in lieu of Law and Government and Intro to Economics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following: constitutional underpinnings of the government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media’s effect on government, institutions of the national government, public policy, civil rights and liberties. An online economic component is included. A summer assignment is required. AP exam required. $93.00 AP exam fee is required. 1 year, level 4.

Current Events I

This one semester course will cover local, national, and global newsworthy events involving politics, economics, technological advancements and cultural changes. Set up in a seminar discussion group format, there will be no final exam and an alpha grade will be given. Course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. 1 semester, 4 day cycle, level 1.

Current Events II

Covering the same topics as Current Events I such as local, national and global news events involving politics, economics, technological advancements and cultural changes. Attention is paid to medial literacy and assessment of news sources. Set up in a seminar group discussion format, with no final exam and an alpha grade will be given. Course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Students must have taken Current Events or Current Events I. 1 semester, 4 days/cycle, level 1.